Latest APTA News

The following excerpts were adapted from materials provided by the American Physical Therapy Association media page:

AMERICAN PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION NAMED SCIENCE PARTNER TO THE PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL ON PHYSICAL FITNESS AND SPORTS

The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports (PCPFS) formally named the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) as Science Partner on Friday, Nov 16, during APTA’s “Preview 2020” conference, Nov 16-18 in Phoenix, Arizona.

“The President’s Council recognizes and values APTA’s commitment to elevating the application of science to physical therapist practice,” said Melissa Johnson, executive director of PCPFS. “We look forward to working in close collaboration to improve the health, physical activity, and fitness levels of Americans of all ages and abilities.” APTA and PCPFS will work together on the development and dissemination of strategies for promoting the value of physical fitness.

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PHYSICAL THERAPY IN ICU REDUCES HOSPITAL STAYS, STUDY SHOWS

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) cites the results of the first study to show the effectiveness of early physical therapy for patients in a medical intensive care unit (ICU). The study, conducted by Peter Morris, MD, associate professor in the Section on Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Immunologic Diseases at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, was presented at the October 23 meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

“This non-randomized study, the first of its kind on this particular topic, proves that the skills of a physical therapist are essential to the expedient recovery of ICU patients,” said Mary Pat C Jobes, PT, MA, president of APTA’s Acute Care Section and manager of physical therapy at Haywood Park Community Hospital in Brownsville, Tennessee.

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PT TREATMENT CAN PROVIDE RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WITH COPD

Physical therapist treatment for COPD, which includes breathing training and exercise, can help improve the quality of life for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) stated in recognition of November’s National COPD Awareness Month.

COPD, also called emphysema or chronic bronchitis, is a serious lung disease that over time makes it difficult for a person to breathe. For people who have COPD, the airways (tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs) are partially blocked, which makes it difficult to expel air. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, with more women than men dying of the disease. The number of people living with COPD is increasing.

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